Los Angeles: Unrest 91-92

July 2015



       LATASHA HARLINS

            July 14, 1975 – March 16, 1991

"It was midafternoon on a warm day in late April 1992, when the nation and the world turned its attention to Los Angeles. For the next five days, they watched in horror as thousands of residents took to the streets to burn and loot, sometimes even to assault and kill. "No justice, no peace!" was the anthem of the day as local blacks, Latinos, and even a sprinkling of Asian Americans and whites joined in the five-day "rebellion" that purportedly underscored the injustice of the first verdict in the Rodney King police brutality trial. But for many who actively joined in the rebellion, and for the thousands who stayed at home, but understood all too well why others acted, Rodney King was not the symbol of injustice that was being protested; Latasha Harlins was."

Excerpt: "Latasha Harlins, Soon Ja Du, and Joyce Karlin: A Case Study of Multicultural Female Violence and Justice on the Urban Frontier," by Brenda E. Stevenson

 

Photography by Kirk McKoy



"Here on Earth, tell me what's a black life worth, a bottle of juice, is no excuse, the truth hurts."  

Tupac Shakur, I Wonder if Heaven Got a Ghetto


Photograph by Kirk McKoy

Photograph by Kirk McKoy

Photograph by Kirk McKoy

Photograph by Kirk McKoy


"Her mother was murdered in a nightclub when Latasha was just 9 years old."


Photograph by Kirk McKoy

Photograph by Kirk McKoy

Photograph by Kirk McKoy

Photograph by Kirk McKoy

Photograph by Kirk McKoy

Photograph by Kirk McKoy

 Photograph by Hyungwon Kang

 Photograph by Hyungwon Kang

Photograph by Kirk McKoy

Photograph by Kirk McKoy

Photograph by Ken Lubas

Photograph by Ken Lubas

 

"A number of neighborhoods were touched by the 1992 violence, but the epicenter was in South-Central. A decayed expanse of ticky-tacky stucco houses and aging factories, South-Central has long served as a door to L.A. for immigrant minorities. During World War II and its aftermath, blacks settled there, drawn by work in rubber plants and other industrial ventures. Later, black-owned retail in the area was bought up by Koreans who couldn't afford stores in more prosperous areas. And L.A.'s fast-growing Hispanic population began to move in, advancing block-by-block."

An excerpt from L.A.'s Darkest Days

 

Photograph by Don Emmert

Photograph by Don Emmert

Photograph by Hal Garb

Photograph by Hal Garb

Photograph by Ken Lubas

Photograph by Ken Lubas


"The passengers in the plane didn't know the verdict before the plane had left the east coast, but the outcome was clear. ”

Joel Brokaw, Three Rivers, California                                                                                                                                            


Photograph by Marilyn Weiss

Photograph by Marilyn Weiss

Photograph by Larry Davis

Photograph by Larry Davis

"She wore the same kind of clothes every day -- blue dickies, a white T-shirt, and a black hoodie, always a black hoodie, and black LA Gear."

An excerpt from The Contested Murder of Latasha Harlins by Brenda E. Stevenson

 

Photograph by Patrick Downs

Photograph by Patrick Downs